The expansive rolling hills of southeastern Pennsylvania was one of the first agricultural areas settled in America. The original farms were modest, but soon, massive, majestic farm houses and traditional bank barns dotted the landscape.  Amazingly, a very large number of these historic structures have survived, on farms that are still crisply groomed and carefully preserved. In fact, the number of historic farms listed on the National Register of Historic Places surrounding Historic Boyertown outranks most other areas. Roads that connect the farms are beautiful scenic routes that you can enjoy, as you move from one beautiful location to another. 

Of the nearly 30 locations on the Historic Farm Trail, 10 are open for touring, with the other 20 in between, drive by only.  The touring spots are interesting, ranging from the famous Rodale Institute which invented organic farming in the US, located in the Siegfried’s Dale Farm, Ridgewood Winery, located at Ridgewood Farm, the Daniel Boone Homestead, and Pottsgrove, home of one of the region’s most prosperous ironmasters, to Pennypacker Mills, which served as George Washington’s headquarters, Old Morlattan Village, the earliest settlement in the area, and the Henry Fisher Farm, still a working farm.  

It’s going to take more than one day to enjoy the whole Historic Farm Trail and visit all the stops, so plan to book into the Twin Turrets Inn, to reside in Victorian luxury in between exploring. Have dinner in a different restaurant in Historic Boyertown every night of your stay.  Browse through the shops on our delightful little town. At the end of your Historic Farm Trail adventure, plan to ride the Colebrookdale Railroad into the Secret Valley, to learn more about the history of the area.

Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles
85 West Walnut Street, Boyertown, PA

Early in 1872, the local newspaper announced that J. Sweinhart has opened a new carriage factory near the Mt. Pleasant Seminary for the manufacture of carriages, buggies, spring wagons and sleighs, the same vehicles that would have been used on the farms you are about to see.

The factory still stands today, now part of the Boyertown Auto Body Works, which made car and truck bodies in Boyertown until 1990. Transformed into the Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles, not only are Mr. Sweinhart’s carriages and sleighs still on display, there are authentic examples of all the other vehicles, gasoline, electric and horse-drawn, made over the years. High wheel bicycles, trolleys, original commercial car and truck bodies and precisely restored cars round out the collection.

There’s also a 1921 Sunoco Gas Station and the 1938 Fegley’s Diner. Be sure to check if the Museum is holding one of its popular events while you are in town.

Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles
85 West Walnut Street, Boyertown, PA

Early in 1872, the local newspaper announced that J. Sweinhart has opened a new carriage factory near the Mt. Pleasant Seminary for the manufacture of carriages, buggies, spring wagons and sleighs, the same vehicles that would have been used on the farms you are about to see.

The factory still stands today, now part of the Boyertown Auto Body Works, which made car and truck bodies in Boyertown until 1990. Transformed into the Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles, not only are Mr. Sweinhart’s carriages and sleighs still on display, there are authentic examples of all the other vehicles, gasoline, electric and horse-drawn, made over the years. High wheel bicycles, trolleys, original commercial car and truck bodies and precisely restored cars round out the collection.

There’s also a 1921 Sunoco Gas Station and the 1938 Fegley’s Diner. Be sure to check if the Museum is holding one of its popular events while you are in town.

Conrad Grubb Homestead
851 Perkiomenville Road, Perkiomenville, PA

The 2 1/2 story Germanic style Conrad Grubb Homestead, built in 1754, is a prime example of a restored Germanic home which also hosted a home industry. Conrad Grubb is known to have been an active weaver and a number of the features of his dwelling house with a brick addition were installed to facilitate the weaving trade. The house is surrounded with a barn with milk house attached by a breezeway, a shed, well house, attached arched dirt cellar, restored 18th century garden and a meadow enclosed with restored worm and post rail fencing. Drive by only.

Philip Christman House
422 Gehman Road, Barto, PA

The Philip Christman House is typical of Germanic architecture built between 1730 and 1750 in the Oley Valley. The original structure was built in the Swiss Bank tradition, with the gable on the right front side settled in a small bank, which is the sole means to reach the upper floor of the house. Other buildings on the property include a 2 1/2 story plastered stone house, five bays across and two rooms deep, a large wood and stone barn with an unusual arched doorway, a square hipped-roof 1 1/2 story stone structure and an early 19th century smokehouse with a beehive oven and fireplace. Drive by only.

Philip Christman House
422 Gehman Road, Barto, PA

The Philip Christman House is typical of Germanic architecture built between 1730 and 1750 in the Oley Valley. The original structure was built in the Swiss Bank tradition, with the gable on the right front side settled in a small bank, which is the sole means to reach the upper floor of the house. Other buildings on the property include a 2 1/2 story plastered stone house, five bays across and two rooms deep, a large wood and stone barn with an unusual arched doorway, a square hipped-roof 1 1/2 story stone structure and an early 19th century smokehouse with a beehive oven and fireplace. Drive by only.

Rodale Siegfried’s Dale Farm
611 Siegfriedale Road, Kutztown, PA

Seventy years ago, when the concept of organic farming was revolutionary and not well understood, organic pioneer J.I. Rodale studied the connection between the quality of the soil and the quality of the produce grown in it, creating the motto Healthy Soil = Healthy Food = Healthy People. This motto has guided the farming practices of the Rodale Institute ever since. In spite of the pushback in the early years, Rodale was convinced that “organics was not a fad.” In fact, the farming methods use long-established practices from other countries that were much more firmly grounded than the current chemical flair of American practices. Now, seven decades in the future, organic farms are the fastest growing category of agriculture in the nation, as well as in the Boyertown area. In addition to maintaining working organic farm operations, today, Rodale is well known for publications and other helpful materials to enable farmers to establish and maintain sustainable organic farms throughout the nation. Take the audio supported walking tour on the property to learn more about what Rodale does.

Keim Homestead
99 Boyer Road, Oley, PA

Johannes Keim, a native of Lindau, Germany came to Pennsylvania in 1698, scouting for land as rich as in Germany’s Black Forest. Discovering the high quality soil in the Oley Valley, Keim began building his farm in 1706 with a log cabin, which he replaced with a stone cabin in 1732, considerably larger than other similar aged structures in the area. As Keim prospered, he built another

2 1/2 story house in sections, the first with a large central chimney and massive fireplace in 1750, and a two bay extension in 1780, at that point joining the various parts of the structure under one continuous roof. Today, the carefully preserved farm structures are considered one of the most important sites of Pennsylvania German architecture in the region.

Keim Homestead
99 Boyer Road, Oley, PA

Johannes Keim, a native of Lindau, Germany came to Pennsylvania in 1698, scouting for land as rich as in Germany’s Black Forest. Discovering the high quality soil in the Oley Valley, Keim began building his farm in 1706 with a log cabin, which he replaced with a stone cabin in 1732, considerably larger than other similar aged structures in the area. As Keim prospered, he built another

2 1/2 story house in sections, the first with a large central chimney and massive fireplace in 1750, and a two bay extension in 1780, at that point joining the various parts of the structure under one continuous roof. Today, the carefully preserved farm structures are considered one of the most important sites of Pennsylvania German architecture in the region.

Johan DeTurk Cabin
30 Historic Lane, Oley, PA

The Issac DeTurk family immigrated to America from the same town in France the Levan family came from, with both Huguenot families escaping when the political protections afforded to Protestants in France were revoked in 1685. Issac’s son Johan, who built the cabin, married in 1740 and raised 12 children on his farm. Being of Moravian faith, the DeTurk farm became the center of Moravian activity in the Oley Valley. Count Zinzendorf, the founder of the Moravian faith in America held the third conference of Moravians, Seventh Day Baptists, Dunkards, Separatists, Lutheran, Mennonite and Reformed followers in the United States at the DeTurk farm in 1742. Johan’s son, John was also the third owner of the old Boone farm where Daniel Boone was born. Open selected times and hours.

Reiff Farm
495 Old State Road, Oley, PA

Established in 1742, Reiff Farm is a great example of a self-sufficient of the type of self-sufficient farm developed in the Oley Valley, the first region to be farmed in the Boyertown area. In this case, the first building on the farm to be constructed was the blacksmith shop, which provided Reiff with a source of income while he cleared the land and prepared to plant and in which the family lived in the blacksmith shop until a log house was completed. That house was ultimately incorporated into a Georgian style home in 1800. In addition to a traditional Pennsylvania barn, outbuildings were added as the farm prospered. Because so much of this property remains completely intact, it is considered a remarkable historical example of rural Pennsylvania architecture.

Reiff Farm
495 Old State Road, Oley, PA

Established in 1742, Reiff Farm is a great example of a self-sufficient of the type of self-sufficient farm developed in the Oley Valley, the first region to be farmed in the Boyertown area. In this case, the first building on the farm to be constructed was the blacksmith shop, which provided Reiff with a source of income while he cleared the land and prepared to plant and in which the family lived in the blacksmith shop until a log house was completed. That house was ultimately incorporated into a Georgian style home in 1800. In addition to a traditional Pennsylvania barn, outbuildings were added as the farm prospered. Because so much of this property remains completely intact, it is considered a remarkable historical example of rural Pennsylvania architecture.

Henry Fisher House
1816 PA Route 662, Oley, PA

On a farm that is still a successful, working farm in the Oley Valley, the Henry Fisher House is considered a “textbook” example of early 18th century Georgian architecture with strict symmetrical construction and proportions. The exterior trim and interior woodwork in the home, copied from one of the standard books on building of the time, appears to have been milled in Philadelphia and shipped to the location. The house is complemented with a 1740 stone barn and other typical outbuildings.

Astonishingly, the same family has lived in the house since it was completed and still work the farm, delivering farm fresh produce to the local area.

de Benneville House
PA Route 662, 1.5 miles north of Yellow House, PA

Few know that the founder of the Universalist faith, now part of Unitarian Universalist Church in the United States, lived in the Boyertown area and operated an apothecary shop in the Oley Valley. George de Benneville came to America in 1742, after having been raised at the English court as an orphan. He believed his near death experience from fever revealed his lifelong beliefs that lead to the foundation of the Universalist Church. After conducting religious services in a borrowed Moravian Church, he built the house to serve as both a residence and house of worship in 1745. Services were held on the second floor in a room that ran almost completely across the front of the house and two-thirds to the back. Drive by only.

de Benneville House
PA Route 662, 1.5 miles north of Yellow House, PA

Few know that the founder of the Universalist faith, now part of Unitarian Universalist Church in the United States, lived in the Boyertown area and operated an apothecary shop in the Oley Valley. George de Benneville came to America in 1742, after having been raised at the English court as an orphan. He believed his near death experience from fever revealed his lifelong beliefs that lead to the foundation of the Universalist Church. After conducting religious services in a borrowed Moravian Church, he built the house to serve as both a residence and house of worship in 1745. Services were held on the second floor in a room that ran almost completely across the front of the house and two-thirds to the back. Drive by only.

Rhoads-Lorah House and Barn
1832 Old Swede Road, Douglassville, PA

Johann Jacob Rhoads came so early to the Boyertown region, in what was then upper Philadelphia County, that he was well-known to the Lenni-Lanape Indians, who referred to his farm as “the place of five springs.” The farm was first passed on to Johann’s son who raised 10 children on the farm, and then to his grandson. A sister who had been cut out of the will when the farm passed to the third generation, ultimately married neighbor George Lorah and outlasted her bachelor brothers to take over the entire property. The Rhoads daughter and Georg Lorah engaged master builders Conrad Henry and Geottlieb Drexel to build a larger stone home in 1830, before their first child was born in 1831. Drive by only.

Mill Tract Farm (George Boone Homestead)
5571 Mill Road, Douglassville, PA

As Quakers in England, the Boone family, like so many others, moved to America to avoid religious persecution. The eldest Boone in England sent his oldest child to check out William Penn’s colony, before deciding to bring his entire family over. They arrived in Philadelphia in 1717 and after a short stay in Abingdon and 10 years in Bucks County, they settled in the Oley Valley. The original portion of the Mill Tract Farm house was constructed in 1750, with additions added in 1790 and 1820. The stone grist mill dates from 1728, and the stone barn, pig pen and horse barn all date from a later period. Mill Tract Farm is only one of many homes built by the Boone family in the Oley Valley before they moved on to points west and south.

Mill Tract Farm (George Boone Homestead)
5571 Mill Road, Douglassville, PA

As Quakers in England, the Boone family, like so many others, moved to America to avoid religious persecution. The eldest Boone in England sent his oldest child to check out William Penn’s colony, before deciding to bring his entire family over. They arrived in Philadelphia in 1717 and after a short stay in Abingdon and 10 years in Bucks County, they settled in the Oley Valley. The original portion of the Mill Tract Farm house was constructed in 1750, with additions added in 1790 and 1820. The stone grist mill dates from 1728, and the stone barn, pig pen and horse barn all date from a later period. Mill Tract Farm is only one of many homes built by the Boone family in the Oley Valley before they moved on to points west and south.

Boonecroft
640 Oleyline Road, Douglassville, PA

Even though the Daniel Boone Homestead is much more famous, the Boone family (and the Boone Family Association) considers Boonecroft, built by George Boone, the family patriarch and friend of William Penn, to be the family seat in America. The original cabin dates from 1720 and the original portion of the stone house, from 1733. The elder Boone never moved into the stone house. Instead he turned it over to his son James for his growing family.

Levan Farm
3900 Penns Drive, Reading, PA

Levan Farm dates from a land grant from William Penn’s sons, Thomas and Richard, to an old French family which manufactured brocades and taffetas in what became Germany. The oldest sons came to America in 1731 to begin farming, on a farm that has sustained for the past 250 years. The Georgian style house was built in 1837 and the 1 1/2 story addition added later. The property also has a stone and wood frame bank barn, spring house, limekiln, granary, corn crib and wagon shed. Drive by only.

Levan Farm
3900 Penns Drive, Reading, PA

Levan Farm dates from a land grant from William Penn’s sons, Thomas and Richard, to an old French family which manufactured brocades and taffetas in what became Germany. The oldest sons came to America in 1731 to begin farming, on a farm that has sustained for the past 250 years. The Georgian style house was built in 1837 and the 1 1/2 story addition added later. The property also has a stone and wood frame bank barn, spring house, limekiln, granary, corn crib and wagon shed. Drive by only.

Ridgewood Farm
2039 Philadelphia Avenue, Birdsboro, PA

When the Lewis family founded Ridgewood Farm in 1725, they never imagined the buildings would be listed on the National Register of Historic Places nearly 300 later or that the fully restored property would host one of the region’s finest wineries. Ridgewood Winery produces eight sweet wines, three red wines and four white wines. Wine tasters are welcome and you can bring your own snack to enjoy the outdoor tables and grounds of the historic farmstead. The winery also holds a continuing schedule of events, classes, and outdoor concerts. Open regularly scheduled hours.

John Bishop House
5311 Perkiomen Avenue, Reading, PA

The Bishop’s of the Boyertown area were contemporaries of the Boone and Lincoln families and in fact, John Bishop’s wife, Susanna Keim grew up at the Keim Homstead. Although reared as a farmer, John Bishop developed extensive business connections as far away as Virginia, where he operated an iron furnace. During the Revolutionary War, Bishop aided county lieutenants in organizing a militia by providing a large sum of money to raise the troops. He was elected to the General Assembly of Pennsylvania and chosen as a delegate to the Pennsylvania Convention to ratify the United States Constitution in 1787. The land on which the John Bishop house stands was originally owned by the Boone family. Drive by only.

John Bishop House
5311 Perkiomen Avenue, Reading, PA

The Bishop’s of the Boyertown area were contemporaries of the Boone and Lincoln families and in fact, John Bishop’s wife, Susanna Keim grew up at the Keim Homstead. Although reared as a farmer, John Bishop developed extensive business connections as far away as Virginia, where he operated an iron furnace. During the Revolutionary War, Bishop aided county lieutenants in organizing a militia by providing a large sum of money to raise the troops. He was elected to the General Assembly of Pennsylvania and chosen as a delegate to the Pennsylvania Convention to ratify the United States Constitution in 1787. The land on which the John Bishop house stands was originally owned by the Boone family. Drive by only.

Mordecai Lincoln House
315 Owens Place, Birdsboro, PA

Not only did the Boone family, of Daniel Boone fame, settle in the Boyertown area, the ancestors of Abraham Lincoln also lived here. The Mordecai Lincoln house was built by the great-great-grandfather of President Lincoln in 1733, after moving to Pennsylvania in 1720, serving as a partner in Coventry Forge until 1727 and ultimately, buying a 1000 acre farm in the region. John Lincoln, Mordecai’s son who took over the property, was the great-grandfather of Abraham Lincoln. Apparently, having been raised in Indiana and Kentucky, Lincoln had only vague knowledge of his ancestors in Berks County who were so important in the region’s history. Drive by only.

Daniel Boone House
991 Pineland Road, Birdsboro, PA

Famous frontiersman Daniel Boone, who opened the American frontier across the Allegheny Mountains was born in the Boyertown area, not far down the road from the Mordecai Lincoln home. His father, Squire Boone, a skilled weaver and blacksmith came to the Oley Valley in 1730 and the family lived in the area until 1750 when they moved to North Carolina. Today, the Daniel Boone Homestead is a living history museum that illustrates the daily lives of the region’s 18th century frontier settlers. Living history demonstrations, building tours and other activities bring the frontier to life. Open regularly scheduled hours.

Daniel Boone House
991 Pineland Road, Birdsboro, PA

Famous frontiersman Daniel Boone, who opened the American frontier across the Allegheny Mountains was born in the Boyertown area, not far down the road from the Mordecai Lincoln home. His father, Squire Boone, a skilled weaver and blacksmith came to the Oley Valley in 1730 and the family lived in the area until 1750 when they moved to North Carolina. Today, the Daniel Boone Homestead is a living history museum that illustrates the daily lives of the region’s 18th century frontier settlers. Living history demonstrations, building tours and other activities bring the frontier to life. Open regularly scheduled hours.

George Douglass House
31 Old Philadelphia Pike, Douglassville, PA

Old Morlattan Village site of the George Douglass House, (now Douglassville) was the oldest European American settlement in Berks County dating from 1704. Settlers included Swedes from Delaware, English, Welsh, Scots, and German speaking people from Europe (Germany was not yet a country) and Dutch from New Jersey. It was well along when George Douglass arrived in 1760 to establish a thriving country store business, purchasing and shipping wheat, flour, other agricultural products and iron to points south, and bringing in food and retail goods to supply local residents. His mansion, built in 1763 and enlarged in 1800 and 1833, is a full scale example of Georgian domestic architecture with much of the original detail intact. Open regularly scheduled hours.

Simon Meredith House
1200 Daisy Point Road, Pottstown, PA

Simon Meredith, one of the first settlers on French Creek, lived in a cave or “dugout” on his property, before the original portion of the Simon Meredith House, one of the oldest structures in the area was constructed in 1720, partly of stone and partly of logs. Meredith was elected to the Provincial Assembly in 1727.

Like so many Pennsylvania farm houses, the Simon Meredith House grew and grew as the family grew, with additions and wings. Most farms also included a complement of outbuildings such as a barn, springhouse, and wagon house, which also expanded as prosperity allowed. Drive by only.

Simon Meredith House
1200 Daisy Point Road, Pottstown, PA

Simon Meredith, one of the first settlers on French Creek, lived in a cave or “dugout” on his property, before the original portion of the Simon Meredith House, one of the oldest structures in the area was constructed in 1720, partly of stone and partly of logs. Meredith was elected to the Provincial Assembly in 1727.

Like so many Pennsylvania farm houses, the Simon Meredith House grew and grew as the family grew, with additions and wings. Most farms also included a complement of outbuildings such as a barn, springhouse, and wagon house, which also expanded as prosperity allowed. Drive by only.

Stephen Meredith House
Bechtel Lake, Pottstown, PA

The Stephen Meredith House is important to the architecture of the area because it is the only example of a Greek Revival era, temple form house found in the region. Dr. Meredith, son of Simon Meredith, acquired the property in 1844 and began construction on the house immediately. In addition to a residence, the house served as the office of his medical practice until his death in 1874, at which time his sons took over the office which continued until 1891. One of the most imposing private residences in the area, the house reflects and prominence and prosperity of its original owner. In an area where most houses were Georgian, the property illustrates a cosmopolitan awareness of broader influence. Drive by only.

Townsend House
2501 Pottstown Pike, Pottstown, PA

The original Samuel and Priscilla Townsend House was “calculated for a small family” when originally constructed in 1796. Yet, typical of early Pennsylvania farmhouses, the house grew to suit multiple generations to include two major additions, one in the early 19th century and another as late as 1950. The property also includes a springhouse that dates from the original owner James Pugh, when he received the tract of land in 1713. Drive by only.

Townsend House
2501 Pottstown Pike, Pottstown, PA

The original Samuel and Priscilla Townsend House was “calculated for a small family” when originally constructed in 1796. Yet, typical of early Pennsylvania farmhouses, the house grew to suit multiple generations to include two major additions, one in the early 19th century and another as late as 1950. The property also includes a springhouse that dates from the original owner James Pugh, when he received the tract of land in 1713. Drive by only.

Nathan Michener House
1250 Ridge Road, Pottstown, PA

The Nathan Michener House is architecturally important because it represents the transition from earlier Georgian architecture to Greek Revival which occurred at the beginning of the 19th century. The house, built in 1813, was constructed of random fieldstone quarried locally, decorated with massive corner quoins. Unlike most other Pennsylvania properties, the house has undergone little alternation except for moving the front entrance, the addition of a sun porch and side porch, and repointing of the stonework. Window frames, moldings and the decorated cornice are original. Drive by only.

River Bend Farm
73-87 Sanatoga Road, Pottstown, PA

The first recorded purchase of River Bend Farm was from Thomas and Robert Penn in 1763, when Henry Casdrop purchased 600 acres from William Penn’s sons. Unusual in southeastern Pennsylvania, the property was then purchased for investment and did not have full time residents until 1765, when it was purchased by the Hiester family, a tanner from Sumneytown. Daniel Hiester’s sons served in the American Revolution, in various positions, as member of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania, Brigadier General in the Pennsylvania Militia, all four Congresses, and the state and US Senate.

The architecture of River Bend Farm is more unique in that the stone structure was covered with stucco, but like so many other area structures that were added on to as the family grew.

River Bend Farm
73-87 Sanatoga Road, Pottstown, PA

The first recorded purchase of River Bend Farm was from Thomas and Robert Penn in 1763, when Henry Casdrop purchased 600 acres from William Penn’s sons. Unusual in southeastern Pennsylvania, the property was then purchased for investment and did not have full time residents until 1765, when it was purchased by the Hiester family, a tanner from Sumneytown. Daniel Hiester’s sons served in the American Revolution, in various positions, as member of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania, Brigadier General in the Pennsylvania Militia, all four Congresses, and the state and US Senate.

The architecture of River Bend Farm is more unique in that the stone structure was covered with stucco, but like so many other area structures that were added on to as the family grew.

Philip Rogers House
223 Victoria Chase Drive, Pottstown, PA

Little has changed of the Philip Rogers House over the nearly three centuries that house has been standing. Built of random fieldstone, the first recorded owner of the house dates from 1735, more than a decade after Rogers appeared on the first list of taxables s in the area in 1722. The 1739 date stone on the west elevation appears to have been added at a later date. The 2 and 1/2 story fieldstone kitchen wing was added before 1825. Drive by only.

Pottsgrove Manor
100 West King Street, Pottstown, PA

Built in 1752, Pottsgrove Mansion was the Georgian-style home of John Potts, founder of Pottstown, and the most successful ironmaster in the American Colonies. The historic house, now fully restored and open for touring, originally sat amidst 995 acres of rich Pennsylvania farm land, where Manatawny Creek joins the Schuylkill River. After marrying the granddaughter of Thomas Rutter, the original ironmaster in the Boyertown area and inheriting much of the earlier operations of both his father and Rutter, Potts amassed a huge fortune owning several iron furnaces and forges in the area, plus mines and land in Virginia, and a wharf in Philadelphia.

The massive sandstone and fieldstone structure has been restored to the time of John Potts complete with original furnishings from the period. The house has a typical center plan with a 10 foot wide hall extending from the front to the rear that divides the four rooms on each floor into pairs. Six of the eight main rooms have corner fireplaces, complemented with deep seat windows and reveals. The floors are wide pine boards. For those who appreciate authenticity, when the house was restored, the structure of the main house was kept almost entirely intact, including the flooring, main staircase and paneling. Only a few missing pieces were replaced in the interior.

Pottsgrove Manor
100 West King Street, Pottstown, PA

Built in 1752, Pottsgrove Mansion was the Georgian-style home of John Potts, founder of Pottstown, and the most successful ironmaster in the American Colonies. The historic house, now fully restored and open for touring, originally sat amidst 995 acres of rich Pennsylvania farm land, where Manatawny Creek joins the Schuylkill River. After marrying the granddaughter of Thomas Rutter, the original ironmaster in the Boyertown area and inheriting much of the earlier operations of both his father and Rutter, Potts amassed a huge fortune owning several iron furnaces and forges in the area, plus mines and land in Virginia, and a wharf in Philadelphia.

The massive sandstone and fieldstone structure has been restored to the time of John Potts complete with original furnishings from the period. The house has a typical center plan with a 10 foot wide hall extending from the front to the rear that divides the four rooms on each floor into pairs. Six of the eight main rooms have corner fireplaces, complemented with deep seat windows and reveals. The floors are wide pine boards. For those who appreciate authenticity, when the house was restored, the structure of the main house was kept almost entirely intact, including the flooring, main staircase and paneling. Only a few missing pieces were replaced in the interior.

John Englehardt Homestead
3062 Keyser Road, Schwenksville, PA

Typical of Pennsylvania farmhouses, the John Englehardt Homestead was constructed in three stages, the first, a two bay Germanic style original section in 1725. A second 2 1/2 story Georgian style section was added in 1800. The third frame structure section was built in the mid 19th century. The accompanying stone barn is unique in the area, with a one story stone bottom, unlike the more prevalent double floored Swiss Bank barns. The quality of construction is impressive with finely arched windows and doors and a prominent kicked eave that remains intact. Drive by only.

Landis Homestead
2052 Lucon Road, Schwenksville, PA

The Landis Homestead stands on the original tract of land deeded to Jacob Landis in 1727. The house, constructed in 1839 remains in substantially original condition. This particular homestead was unique in that it was the site of an industrial-agricultural operation that used stored water to an extensive degree. Numerous springs on the property provided a year round flow of water, enabling the development of an early irrigation system. The Landis Corn Plow and Cultivator, an important agricultural tool in early farming, was developed in the blacksmith shop that remains on the property. Drive by only.

Landis Homestead
2052 Lucon Road, Schwenksville, PA

The Landis Homestead stands on the original tract of land deeded to Jacob Landis in 1727. The house, constructed in 1839 remains in substantially original condition. This particular homestead was unique in that it was the site of an industrial-agricultural operation that used stored water to an extensive degree. Numerous springs on the property provided a year round flow of water, enabling the development of an early irrigation system. The Landis Corn Plow and Cultivator, an important agricultural tool in early farming, was developed in the blacksmith shop that remains on the property. Drive by only.

Knurr Log House
23 Meng Road, Schwenksville, PA

It is unusual that a log house from this early a date remains intact and not covered with another material to preserve the logs, yet the Knurr Log House dating from 1750, has generally retained its original architectural integrity. The structure is geometrically precise, so that all the logs that were used were pre cut and when assembled in place, fit together perfectly according to a specifically designed formula. The Knurr Farm remained largely non mechanized for the first 150 years of operation, with many of the details of farm operations being conducted by hand following German techniques and traditions. Drive by only.

Pennypacker Mills
5 Haldeman Road, Schwenksville, PA

Pennypacker Mills, a Colonial Revival mansion, surrounded by 170 acres of rolling Pennsylvania farmland, has had many lives since it was built, starting in 1720. Between 1720 and 1747, it served as the seat of the Hans Jost Hite family which owned many grist mills in the Philadelphia area. The property was then purchased by Peter Pannebacker, hence its name, who retained only the house and farm after 1762. During the American Revolution, George Washington used the house as a headquarters prior to the Battle of Germantown and as a field hospital for injured soldiers after the battle. The gristmill stayed in operation until 1898, when it burned, but was later rebuilt as Pennypacker’s Tea Room in 1923. From 1947 to 1973 it was known as the Old Mill Inn and subsequently the Red Fox Inn, until it burned again.

Pennsylvania Governor Samuel Pennypacker made Pennypacker Mills his summer home in the early 1900s, later living in the house for his term in office as well as until his death in 1916. After eight generations of Pennypackers lived in the house, it was deeded to Montgomery County and restored. Visitors are now able to see the “modern” 1900s kitchen, and other areas where the servants worked, as well as the family living areas, documents signed by George Washington and the many other treasures collected by Pennypacker, who was an avid collector of historic things.

Pennypacker Mills
5 Haldeman Road, Schwenksville, PA

Pennypacker Mills, a Colonial Revival mansion, surrounded by 170 acres of rolling Pennsylvania farmland, has had many lives since it was built, starting in 1720. Between 1720 and 1747, it served as the seat of the Hans Jost Hite family which owned many grist mills in the Philadelphia area. The property was then purchased by Peter Pannebacker, hence its name, who retained only the house and farm after 1762. During the American Revolution, George Washington used the house as a headquarters prior to the Battle of Germantown and as a field hospital for injured soldiers after the battle. The gristmill stayed in operation until 1898, when it burned, but was later rebuilt as Pennypacker’s Tea Room in 1923. From 1947 to 1973 it was known as the Old Mill Inn and subsequently the Red Fox Inn, until it burned again.

Pennsylvania Governor Samuel Pennypacker made Pennypacker Mills his summer home in the early 1900s, later living in the house for his term in office as well as until his death in 1916. After eight generations of Pennypackers lived in the house, it was deeded to Montgomery County and restored. Visitors are now able to see the “modern” 1900s kitchen, and other areas where the servants worked, as well as the family living areas, documents signed by George Washington and the many other treasures collected by Pennypacker, who was an avid collector of historic things.

Long Meadow Farm
2616 Big Road, Gilbertsville, PA

Long Meadow Farm, also known as Plank House and Barn, also used the Germanic pre-metric standard of measurement, yet at the same time adapted Georgian characteristics such as brick, boxed cornices, a symmetrical façade and interior woodwork. The property likely represents attempt to blend these styles in the region. This suggests a conscious effort by Pennsylvania Germans to adopt to the style and culture of English Philadelphia. Drive by only.

Colebrookdale Railroad – The Secret Valley Line
64 S Washington St, Boyertown, PA 19512

Top off your historic farm trail adventure with lunch in high style on the fully restored 1920s Colebrookdale Railroad, that connects visitors with the history, beauty, and nature of one of the most beautiful, unspoiled valleys in America.

While traveling through the timeless landscape which looks much like it did when the first iron-willed, ironmasters ventured to our area, you’ll learn the story of the Secret Valley Line. Relax and enjoy the area’s great cuisine as you meander through the natural beauty.

Colebrookdale Railroad – The Secret Valley Line
64 S Washington St, Boyertown, PA 19512

Top off your historic farm trail adventure with lunch in high style on the fully restored 1920s Colebrookdale Railroad, that connects visitors with the history, beauty, and nature of one of the most beautiful, unspoiled valleys in America.

While traveling through the timeless landscape which looks much like it did when the first iron-willed, ironmasters ventured to our area, you’ll learn the story of the Secret Valley Line. Relax and enjoy the area’s great cuisine as you meander through the natural beauty.