It’s hard to believe standing on the corner of Philadelphia and Reading Avenues in Historic Boyertown, looking around at the beautifully detailed Victorian buildings, that a photograph at the Historical Society shows Boyertown’s beginnings as a mining shanty town. Iron ore deposits were so close to the surface the ore was gathered by hand in wicker baskets. This same iron ore fueled the Colebrookdale Furnace established by Thomas Rutter right outside of Boyertown; the first iron furnace in the New World. That innovation ultimately led to the American Industrial Revolution which changed the face of America forever.

Much has been written about the huge number of iron furnace and forge operations that came to dot the landscape around Boyertown. Yet, few have focused on the fact that the iron ore used to produce the pig iron, stove plates, and other products came from under Boyertown. Over more than two centuries, more than a million tons of ore were pulled from beneath the town. Combined with vast forests in the area that were turned into charcoal to fire the blast furnaces, limestone which lies plentifully under the ground, and water from clear rushing streams, the ore was smelted into molten iron, and then forged into tools, household items, and other products that were useful for life in Colonial America. By 1775, the southeastern region of Pennsylvania had the highest concentration of forges and furnaces found in any area of America and ironmaking dominated the region.

The ironmasters of Pennsylvania became the leaders of colonial society and many left behind large mansions that still stand proudly in the region. Iron mining was so lucrative around Boyertown that famed inventor Thomas Edison came to the area to experiment with a process to extract iron with a huge magnet he called a concentrator, that would require no further manual labor. However, the quantity of ore in his mines near Barto was not sufficient to warrant full scale operations, and he moved on.

Eventually, the famous intersection of the Philadelphia-Kutztown Highway and the Allentown-Reading Road at the center of Boyertown grew into a center of commerce serving the entire area. As you stand in the middle of town, the majestic buildings you see around you grew from manufacturing operations that were established to produce castings and other iron products right in town. Gradually, as mining subsided and manufacturing increased, Boyertown transformed into a beautiful, historic Victorian town graced by the homes and buildings of the industrialists.

We have crafted The Ironmasters Trail, to include 20 locations which reveal the dramatic story of iron making and ironmasters in the Boyertown area. Starting with a visit to see the early photographs of Boyertown at Boyertown Area Historical Society and an excursion on the Colebrookdale Railroad, originally brought in to haul iron ore to market faster than by horse and cart, you’ll be following the trail to ironmasters mansions, early furnaces, forges, and more. The Ironmasters Trail is divided into two loops to make exploring more relaxing and allow you to leisurely learn more of the story. In between stops, you can explore and enjoy Historic Boyertown and enjoy overnight accommodations at the Twin Turrets Inn in Boyertown that will have you residing in Victorian style.

The ironmasters of Pennsylvania became the leaders of colonial society and many left behind large mansions that still stand proudly in the region. Iron mining was so lucrative around Boyertown that famed inventor Thomas Edison came to the area to experiment with a process to extract iron with a huge magnet he called a concentrator, that would require no further manual labor. However, the quantity of ore in his mines near Barto was not sufficient to warrant full scale operations, and he moved on.

Eventually, the famous intersection of the Philadelphia-Kutztown Highway and the Allentown-Reading Road at the center of Boyertown grew into a center of commerce serving the entire area. As you stand in the middle of town, the majestic buildings you see around you grew from manufacturing operations that were established to produce castings and other iron products right in town. Gradually, as mining subsided and manufacturing increased, Boyertown transformed into a beautiful, historic Victorian town graced by the homes and buildings of the industrialists.

We have crafted The Ironmasters Trail, to include 20 locations which reveal the dramatic story of iron making and ironmasters in the Boyertown area. Starting with a visit to see the early photographs of Boyertown at Boyertown Area Historical Society and an excursion on the Colebrookdale Railroad, originally brought in to haul iron ore to market faster than by horse and cart, you’ll be following the trail to ironmasters mansions, early furnaces, forges, and more. The Ironmasters Trail is divided into two loops to make exploring more relaxing and allow you to leisurely learn more of the story. In between stops, you can explore and enjoy Historic Boyertown and enjoy overnight accommodations at the Twin Turrets Inn in Boyertown that will have you residing in Victorian style.

Boyertown Area Historical Society
43 South Chestnut Street, Boyertown PA

Make your first stop on the Ironmasters Trail, the Boyertown Area Historical Society, where you can see pictures of Boyertown with open pit mines, and original stove plates produced by the Colebrookdale Furnace. A display featuring Thomas Edison’s efforts to mine in the area describe his methods and “concentrator,” to save labor extracting iron ore. The very knowledgeable staff at the Historical Society can answer any questions you may have about iron making in the Boyertown area. This location has regular hours of operation and tours by appointment can be arranged.

Colebrookdale Railroad – The Secret Valley Line
64 South Washington Avenue, Boyertown, PA

An excursion on the restored Colebrookdale Railroad will take you into landscapes deep in the Secret Valley that cannot be seen any other way. From your perch on the train high above the valley floor, you’ll see the land where the Colebrookdale Furnace was located just south of Boyertown. Further on, you’ll see a mansion where George Washington stayed while urging the ironmasters to increase production of armaments he needed to keep the Continental Army equipped to fight. The train also passes the Pine Iron Works, which made locomotive boiler steel, and the mansion at the Glasgow Iron Works. Just before reaching Pottstown, the train travels over the first iron bridge built in the United States. The Colebrookdale Railroad has regular excursions.

Colebrookdale Railroad – The Secret Valley Line
64 South Washington Avenue, Boyertown, PA

An excursion on the restored Colebrookdale Railroad will take you into landscapes deep in the Secret Valley that cannot be seen any other way. From your perch on the train high above the valley floor, you’ll see the land where the Colebrookdale Furnace was located just south of Boyertown. Further on, you’ll see a mansion where George Washington stayed while urging the ironmasters to increase production of armaments he needed to keep the Continental Army equipped to fight. The train also passes the Pine Iron Works, which made locomotive boiler steel, and the mansion at the Glasgow Iron Works. Just before reaching Pottstown, the train travels over the first iron bridge built in the United States. The Colebrookdale Railroad has regular excursions.

Pottsgrove Manor
100 West King Street, Pottstown, PA

Tour Pottsgrove Manor built by John Potts, founder of Pottstown, and the Potts family, who were considered the greatest ironmasters in all of the American colonies. John Potts originally arrived in the area in 1725, when his father partnered with Thomas Rutter in the iron business. Over the years as the Potts family intermarried with the Rutter family, and a few other prosperous iron making families, the Potts ended up owning a massive empire of iron mines, forges, furnaces, grist mills, saw mills, farms, slaves, homes, and more in Pennsylvania and Virginia, and a wharf in Philadelphia. Pottsgrove Manor has been restored to the time period of the Potts family to take you back to life in Colonial America. Even though this was the American frontier, there was an elegance to the lives of the Potts family as they entertained George Washington and other colonial notables. Later George Washington used Pottsgrove Manor as a headquarters during the Revolutionary War. Marjorie Potts Wendell, a descendent of John Potts second oldest son and visionary pioneer preservationist, led the effort to restore the house, even contributing substantial personal funds to save the property. This location has regular hours of operation.

Pine Forge, Thomas Rutter’s House
658 Douglas Drive, Douglassville, PA

View the home built by Thomas Rutter, who founded the first iron furnace in the New World, that now stands on the campus of Pine Forge Academy. The original section of the house was constructed in 1730, with additions made in 1800 and 1918. When Rutter established his bloomery furnace based on English technology on Manatawny Creek in 1718, he named it after an iron furnace in England. Rutter’s role in American history, which led to successful iron production in the American colonies and the ability to stop importing these products from England was a major factor that enabled the colonists to declare their independence from England a little more than 50 years later. Under the management of the Rutter, Potts, and Nutt families, the iron industry in Pennsylvania grew from nothing to one of the world’s leading producing regions. Tours can be arranged by appointment.

Pine Forge, Thomas Rutter’s House
658 Douglas Drive, Douglassville, PA

View the home built by Thomas Rutter, who founded the first iron furnace in the New World, that now stands on the campus of Pine Forge Academy. The original section of the house was constructed in 1730, with additions made in 1800 and 1918. When Rutter established his bloomery furnace based on English technology on Manatawny Creek in 1718, he named it after an iron furnace in England. Rutter’s role in American history, which led to successful iron production in the American colonies and the ability to stop importing these products from England was a major factor that enabled the colonists to declare their independence from England a little more than 50 years later. Under the management of the Rutter, Potts, and Nutt families, the iron industry in Pennsylvania grew from nothing to one of the world’s leading producing regions. Tours can be arranged by appointment.

Oley Furnace
Reider Road, Oley, PA

After a beautiful drive on PA route 662 from Pine Forge to Oley, you can view Oley Furnace nestled in a beautiful little hollow on meandering Reider Road just above the town of Oley. Remnants of Oley Furnace sit quietly between the Undee Mill and a fast rushing clear stream that one powered its bellows. The colonial farmhouse and other preserved buildings still stand on the other side of the road. An earlier iron furnace, which molded cast iron stoves, was established on the site in 1744 before the property was sold to Daniel Undee in 1788, who, in addition to being one of the area’s more prominent ironmasters, was a Revolutionary War soldier and statesmen. Drive by view only.

Sally Ann Furnace
47 Sally Furnace Road, Mertztown, PA

Only the ironmasters mansion that Jacob Hunter built for his new bride in 1814, and a few other remnants of Sally Ann Furnace remain from what was once an iron plantation that consisted of 450 acres of forest and 20 buildings in the 1820s and employed 150 men in the furnace and agricultural operations. Throughout the last half of the 19th century, Sally Ann Furnace served as one of the major links in Pennsylvania’s iron industry, producing 30 tons of pig iron weekly that was used by many forges in the area. During the Civil War Sally Ann Furnace changed its operations to manufacture cannon balls for the Union Army. Drive by view only.

Sally Ann Furnace
47 Sally Furnace Road, Mertztown, PA

Only the ironmasters mansion that Jacob Hunter built for his new bride in 1814, and a few other remnants of Sally Ann Furnace remain from what was once an iron plantation that consisted of 450 acres of forest and 20 buildings in the 1820s and employed 150 men in the furnace and agricultural operations. Throughout the last half of the 19th century, Sally Ann Furnace served as one of the major links in Pennsylvania’s iron industry, producing 30 tons of pig iron weekly that was used by many forges in the area. During the Civil War Sally Ann Furnace changed its operations to manufacture cannon balls for the Union Army. Drive by view only.

Mary Ann Furnace
141 State Route 1025, Mertztown, PA

What was once a thriving, yet modest iron plantation begun in 1789, Mary Ann Furnace ultimately employed 30 men with 210 dependents. Instead of building worker housing on the plantation, workers lived in the nearby Village of Longswamp. While in operation, Mary Ann Furnace became famous for production of the “Lehigh Coal Stove” made to burn the hard anthracite coal found in the Lehigh Valley, instead of soft coal so abundant in other locations in Pennsylvania. The stoves, which were apparently cast in open sand, were made at the furnace until 1857. Today, Mary Ann Furnace is a lovely preserved farm, where the original house and bank barn dating from the 1830 that have undergone only minor alterations since that time. Drive by view only.

Dale Furnace
390 Dale Road, Barto, PA

Similar to Sally Ann Furnace, only the ironmasters mansion, a few other buildings, and a monument to the Dale Iron Works across the road, are all that remains of Dale Furnace, built by Joseph and Thomas Potts in 1791. Much of the iron ore for the furnace was transported from the Colebrookdale mines near Boyertown. Responding to the needs of daily life on the colonial frontier, Dale Furnace produced stoves, skillets, kettles, anvils, and other household items, along with cannon balls and canister shells what were used in the War of 1812. In 1826, the property was sold to George and Davis Schall in who ran Dale Forge for another 45 years. David died at the Dale Iron Works in 1877, at the ripe old age of 76. The ironmasters mansion has remained in the family until the present day. Drive by view only.

Dale Furnace
390 Dale Road, Barto, PA

Similar to Sally Ann Furnace, only the ironmasters mansion, a few other buildings, and a monument to the Dale Iron Works across the road, are all that remains of Dale Furnace, built by Joseph and Thomas Potts in 1791. Much of the iron ore for the furnace was transported from the Colebrookdale mines near Boyertown. Responding to the needs of daily life on the colonial frontier, Dale Furnace produced stoves, skillets, kettles, anvils, and other household items, along with cannon balls and canister shells what were used in the War of 1812. In 1826, the property was sold to George and Davis Schall in who ran Dale Forge for another 45 years. David died at the Dale Iron Works in 1877, at the ripe old age of 76. The ironmasters mansion has remained in the family until the present day. Drive by view only.

Bechtelsville, PA

Famed inventor, Thomas Edison, who was a resident of New Jersey, traveled to Southeastern Pennsylvania for more than a two year period to ply his trade in the iron industry, staying at the Bechtelsville Hotel while in the area. He rode the Colebrookdale Railroad every week to test the iron samples in the region. Edison’s mines were actually located closer to Barto, PA, but there is little left of any of the structures to view. The hotel is now the Union House Restaurant.

Popodickon Mansion
167 South Ironstone Drive, Boyertown, PA

Now traveling back to Boyertown, some say the spirits of the Potts family still live on in Popodickon, a mansion built for Thomas and Martha Potts in 1732. The house was named for Popodick, a legendary Delaware Native American chief said to be buried on the property. Potts bought the property from Thomas Rutter, who also leased him the Colebookdale Furnace in 1725. Potts did well enough to buy a two-thirds share in the furnace, a one-third share in Pine Forge and build his mansion of brick imported from Wales. Potts and his wife Martha gave the property to his son John upon his marriage in 1734. When John Potts and his family moved to Pottsgrove Manor in 1753, they passed the property on to his daughter and her husband, Thomas Rutter III. With a center hall and other similar details, the slightly less grand Popodickon appears to have served as a model for Pottsgrove Manor. When the current owner bought the property 40 years ago, which had substantially deteriorated by that point, she carried out a complete restoration on the grand historic house. Drive by view only.

Popodickon Mansion
167 South Ironstone Drive, Boyertown, PA

Now traveling back to Boyertown, some say the spirits of the Potts family still live on in Popodickon, a mansion built for Thomas and Martha Potts in 1732. The house was named for Popodick, a legendary Delaware Native American chief said to be buried on the property. Potts bought the property from Thomas Rutter, who also leased him the Colebookdale Furnace in 1725. Potts did well enough to buy a two-thirds share in the furnace, a one-third share in Pine Forge and build his mansion of brick imported from Wales. Potts and his wife Martha gave the property to his son John upon his marriage in 1734. When John Potts and his family moved to Pottsgrove Manor in 1753, they passed the property on to his daughter and her husband, Thomas Rutter III. With a center hall and other similar details, the slightly less grand Popodickon appears to have served as a model for Pottsgrove Manor. When the current owner bought the property 40 years ago, which had substantially deteriorated by that point, she carried out a complete restoration on the grand historic house. Drive by view only.

Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site/French Creek State Park
2 Mark Bird Lane, Elverson, PA

Strolling around the serene landscape of Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, you’d almost expect to see a horse pulling a cart of charcoal, to come around the side of a building, or see the ironmasters children running about the yard. Considered one of the finest and best preserved iron plantations in the nation, today Hopewell appears to have just been put to sleep, ready to rise another day to make iron. There are 14 preserved structures including the ironmasters mansion and the blast furnace, in which the original waterwheel that once relentlessly powered the furnace bellows, still turns. Put into blast just before the American Revolution in 1771, Hopewell Furnace was instrumental in aiding George Washington and the Continental Army to win the American Revolution. The iron plantation was originally surrounded by the heavily forested land that now makes up French Creek State Park, which was restored into timber after being clear cut to fuel the furnace with charcoal. Start your visit in the theater in the Visitor Center watching the very well done 15 minute history of the Hopewell Furnace community. Take the self-guided walking tour of the iron plantation complete with the audio “Voices of Hopewell” which brings to life the villagers who lived and worked here. Stroll up into French Creek State Park on any one of the many trails that lead up into the Park.

Joanna Furnace
1250 Furnace Road, Geigertown, PA

Tour Joanna Furnace, another iron plantation owned by the Potts and Rutter families, established in 1791 in the semi-wilderness of Robeson Township. Unlike other furnaces in the region, Joanna was a cold blast, single stack charcoal iron furnace that was converted to steam power in the mid 1850’s. The operation was so successful that guttermen, potters, and fillers worked 12 hour shifts, around the clock including Christmas and New Year’s, tapping the molten iron twice daily. The woodcutters and colliers who made the charcoal to power the furnace worked 24 hours a day for nine months each year, with little sleep. The original furnace stack is still standing, along with a portion of the raceway, along with the blower/engine house, and the store/office building. The foundations of the charcoal storage building, the casting house, the blacksmith shop, the ironmasters mansion, and the barn illustrate where the remainder of the buildings were placed. You can observe living history presentations on various topics as you tour.

Joanna Furnace
1250 Furnace Road, Geigertown, PA

Tour Joanna Furnace, another iron plantation owned by the Potts and Rutter families, established in 1791 in the semi-wilderness of Robeson Township. Unlike other furnaces in the region, Joanna was a cold blast, single stack charcoal iron furnace that was converted to steam power in the mid 1850’s. The operation was so successful that guttermen, potters, and fillers worked 12 hour shifts, around the clock including Christmas and New Year’s, tapping the molten iron twice daily. The woodcutters and colliers who made the charcoal to power the furnace worked 24 hours a day for nine months each year, with little sleep. The original furnace stack is still standing, along with a portion of the raceway, along with the blower/engine house, and the store/office building. The foundations of the charcoal storage building, the casting house, the blacksmith shop, the ironmasters mansion, and the barn illustrate where the remainder of the buildings were placed. You can observe living history presentations on various topics as you tour.

Warwick County Park Iron Tour
382 County Park Road, Pottstown, PA

During the 18th and 19th centuries, the woodlands of what is now Warwick County Park provided much of the raw timber used to make charcoal for the furnaces and forges in the nearby area. Enjoy the outdoors taking the three quarters of a mile Iron and Heritage Loop Trail that has been designed to help visitors imagine what the woods looked like when the production of charcoal from the forests was in full swing. A sign at each remaining charcoal pit along the trail describes the process of harvesting wood, building and tending the fires, and the life of colliers who did the work As you hike the trail that ultimately takes you to the Umer House Ruins which include the remains of an iron furnace, it will intersect with the Charcoal Trail to take you back to the Visitor Center.

Warwick Furnace Farms
Valley and Warwick Furnace Roads, Knauertown, PA

The Rutter, Potts, Nutt, and Savage families were also integral to the development of Warwick Furnace Farm and Warwick Farm, which today are Warwick Furnace Farms. The furnace and the charcoal house are in ruins, but the ironmasters house, three barns, tenant houses and outbuildings are well preserved. A good illustration of how all the prominent iron making families were closely tied together, in 1717 Samuel Nutt acquired a tract in Warwick Township that furnished ore for all the early furnaces in the French Creek area, and began a forge at Coventry, which you will travel through later. Shortly after, he married Anna Savage, the daughter of Thomas Rutter, and the widow of Samuel Savage, Rutter’s early partner. When he died in 1737, he left instructions for his wife to proceed with plans for the furnace that became Warwick Furnace Farms. The whole property is currently under restoration. Drive by view only.

Warwick Furnace Farms
Valley and Warwick Furnace Roads, Knauertown, PA

The Rutter, Potts, Nutt, and Savage families were also integral to the development of Warwick Furnace Farm and Warwick Farm, which today are Warwick Furnace Farms. The furnace and the charcoal house are in ruins, but the ironmasters house, three barns, tenant houses and outbuildings are well preserved. A good illustration of how all the prominent iron making families were closely tied together, in 1717 Samuel Nutt acquired a tract in Warwick Township that furnished ore for all the early furnaces in the French Creek area, and began a forge at Coventry, which you will travel through later. Shortly after, he married Anna Savage, the daughter of Thomas Rutter, and the widow of Samuel Savage, Rutter’s early partner. When he died in 1737, he left instructions for his wife to proceed with plans for the furnace that became Warwick Furnace Farms. The whole property is currently under restoration. Drive by view only.

Reading Furnace
125 Mansion Road, Elverson, PA

Beautifully preserved Reading Furnace, now Reading Furnace Farm situated in the rolling hills of Chester County began in 1736 and served until 1812, when it was transformed into a working farm. While it operated, the furnace produced over 800 tons of pig and bar iron a year. The magnificent mansion, one of the most complex and architecturally sophisticated buildings in the iron region, was constructed in three sections between 1744 and 1936. In addition to the home, the property still hosts a tenant house, barn, large shed, and three outbuildings that were a part of the iron plantation. Drive by view only.

St. Peter’s Village
St. Peter’s Road, Off PA Route 23

Delightful, colorful little St. Peter’s Village was once an ironmasters mining village. Spurs of the Reading Company and Delaware River Railroad and Lancaster Railroad lines once ran through the village to serve local mining that included extraction of deposits of garnet and pyrite, along with the forging operations. In the 1970s, when the iron operations ceased, local preservationists and citizens worked together to preserve the village as a destination, where now local ordinances prevent alterations to the exteriors to the historic structures and limit new construction. This approach has kept the carefully preserved structures and the village completely intact. The “Excursion House,” a hotel built in the early years, is now the Inn at St. Peter’s Village.

St. Peter’s Village
St. Peter’s Road, Off PA Route 23

Delightful, colorful little St. Peter’s Village was once an ironmasters mining village. Spurs of the Reading Company and Delaware River Railroad and Lancaster Railroad lines once ran through the village to serve local mining that included extraction of deposits of garnet and pyrite, along with the forging operations. In the 1970s, when the iron operations ceased, local preservationists and citizens worked together to preserve the village as a destination, where now local ordinances prevent alterations to the exteriors to the historic structures and limit new construction. This approach has kept the carefully preserved structures and the village completely intact. The “Excursion House,” a hotel built in the early years, is now the Inn at St. Peter’s Village.

Coventryville
3501 Coventryville Road, Pottstown, PA

Iron operations at Coventryville date from a land grant of 1717 on which the Coventry Forge was later constructed, but later than Thomas Rutter’s Colebrookdale Furnace. Owner Samuel Nutt formed a partnership with Mordecai Lincoln, great-great grandfather of President Abraham Lincoln, which resulted in very successful iron operations. In 1757, Coventry passed to Thomas Potts. By the Revolutionary War, the operation, then owned by Samuel Potts and Thomas Rutter, was supplying munitions for the Continental Army. In the early 1800s, Coventry Forge was enlarged and re-equipped, and the present village was constructed around it. This expanded operation led to the earliest steel successfully produced in the United States. Coventry Hall, the ironmasters mansion, built between 1740 and 1760, still stands at the edge of the village. Drive by view only.

Welkinweir
1368 Prizer Road, Pottstown, PA

Welkinweir, now an arboretum and garden that is part of Hopewell Big Woods, was established as an early iron tilt forge in 1791 by blacksmith Samuel Rea. In 1827, William Morris, a blacksmith from Reading came to work at the forge and married the owner’s daughter. Over his lifetime, Morris not only acquired the forge and surrounding farm, he also amassed several surrounding farms that now host the arboretum, and built a stone 5-bay two story house which is the restored home on the property today. This location has regular hours of operation.

Welkinweir
1368 Prizer Road, Pottstown, PA

Welkinweir, now an arboretum and garden that is part of Hopewell Big Woods, was established as an early iron tilt forge in 1791 by blacksmith Samuel Rea. In 1827, William Morris, a blacksmith from Reading came to work at the forge and married the owner’s daughter. Over his lifetime, Morris not only acquired the forge and surrounding farm, he also amassed several surrounding farms that now host the arboretum, and built a stone 5-bay two story house which is the restored home on the property today. This location has regular hours of operation.

Optional Locations

As you leave the Boyertown area, there are two other locations that may be of interest to visit:

Phoenixville Foundry,
2 North Main Street, Phoenixville, PA

The massive building that housed the Phoenixville Iron and Steel Works has been restored as an event facility in which preservationists were able to retain many of the unique elements of the building’s iron production. When you traveled on the Colebrookdale Railroad, you crossed a bridge manufactured by the Phoenix Bridge Company, which purchased its iron components from the Foundry. There is a huge wooden crane still in its original location in the Foundry, thought to be the last and largest of its kind in the United States. Other integral equipment includes two cupolas, two core ovens, and four gantry cranes used to move sand molds and heavy castings around the shop floor. The Column Truss Bridge and the Phoenix Columns in the Symbols of Steel Sculpture Garden are symbolic of work at the Foundry. This location has regular hours of operation.

National Iron and Steel Heritage Museum,
50 South First Avenue, Coatesville, PA

Unusual in the iron industry in colonial America, the iron foundry and mill in which the National Iron and Steel Heritage Museum at Coatesville was constructed, was managed by a woman, who created the first successful iron making operation on the Brandywine River. This Museum tells the story of ironmaking in the region from its beginnings at Boyertown to today. Here, you can learn more about Thomas Potts, who is included in the Iron and Steel Hall of Fame. This location has regular hours of operation.

National Iron and Steel Heritage Museum,
50 South First Avenue, Coatesville, PA

Unusual in the iron industry in colonial America, the iron foundry and mill in which the National Iron and Steel Heritage Museum at Coatesville was constructed, was managed by a woman, who created the first successful iron making operation on the Brandywine River. This Museum tells the story of ironmaking in the region from its beginnings at Boyertown to today. Here, you can learn more about Thomas Potts, who is included in the Iron and Steel Hall of Fame. This location has regular hours of operation.