Welcome to Historic Boyertown! Our quaint, historic town is the oldest in the region— with property records for the land dating back to 1601—more than 75 years before William Penn arrived in America! Also, few know that Boyertown is the gateway to one of the most historic regions in the United States, where, in 1718, the iron industry in the New World was born, and an area that George Washington frequented when he needed arms for the American Revolution. Before moving on to learn these fascinating stories on Historic Boyertown’s seven regional trails, which incorporate our special attractions in Boyertown, as well as the wealth of interesting locations within a 20 mile radius surrounding our town, you can enjoy the first class historic attractions, shops, and restaurants that catch your eye, and learn about our heritage right in town.

Over 250 years ago, when iron ore was discovered right under the streets of Boyertown, the town began a tradition of making things. Soon Boyertown was bustling with manufacturing everything from cigars produced from local tobacco, carriages and other vehicles used on local farms, caskets that ultimately became world renown, and some of the first car and truck bodies manufactured in America.

As the centuries passed, Boyertown evolved into the impeccably preserved, walkable, charming place you see today. The Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles features the antique carriages and vehicles made right here in town. Taylor Backes, Dancing Tree Creations and Studio B produce and display fine art, glass and works of regional and national artists. The Colebrookdale Railroad takes you back to the 1920s. And, you can taste and savor local food produced by loving hands and timeless traditions.

To make your walk through Historic Boyertown most interesting, we’ve combined information about the historic buildings you‟ll pass by, in which historic attractions , shops and restaurants are now located, plus details about the “Bears” you’ll see that are part of the Bear Fever Trail that runs through town. More than 70 bears were sponsored by local merchants, civic organizations and businesses around town, all originally painted by local high school students. Once they caught on, there are now bears in Boyertown that were decorated by artists across the country.

Twin Turrets Inn
11 East Philadelphia Avenue

When you plan your visit to Historic Boyertown, we are confident that you will want to spend plenty of time exploring our town and our trails. Accommodations at the Twin Turrets Inn, 11 East Philadelphia Avenue let you stay in high Victorian style, plus place you right at the center of town with exploring to do in all directions.

You’ll meet your first two Bear Fever bears, Boyertown High School’s Townie Bear and Bubbles that grace each side of the Twin Turrets. The former residence of the Boyer family has been completely restored into an elegant Bed and Breakfast with 10 rooms. Marianne Deery, owner of Twin Turrets also serves as the very delightful Mayor of Boyertown. Enjoy her gracious hospitality and the high style accommodations when you stay.

Historic Boyertown Visitors Center
Building A Better Boyertown Office
3 East Philadelphia Avenue

Leaving the Twin Turrets, just up the street you‘ll find the Historic Boyertown Visitors Center located inside the Building A Better Boyertown Office, located in a building that originally served as a residence and store rooms for D. B. Boyer‘s cigar factory next door at 1 East Philadelphia. In 1866, the location became the head office of one of the local iron works, an industry that drove the economy in town for more than a century.

The Visitors Center has information about all the local attractions, regional trails and services and amenities available in Boyertown, and can also help you with the Bear Fever Walk. There‘s a lot to see and do here, and we want to make your visit the most enjoyable possible.

Intersection of Philadelphia and Reading Avenues

Walking west towards Reading Avenue will take you to the most important crossroads in the area. Long before Boyertown, this was the intersection of Native Americans trails between Reading and Philadelphia, Allentown and Pottstown. Look up at the crisply painted trim at the top of the buildings; detailing which characterizes buildings constructed when Boyertown began growing during the reign of Queen Victoria between 1840 and 1910. Builders began incorporating the non-traditional shapes, colors, towers, turrets, dormers, wide wrap around porches, stained glass windows and colorfully painted ornate trim work that became the hallmark of this era.

Looking around at the four corners, you’ll see 1 East Philadelphia Avenue, built by D.B. Boyer for his daughter’s husband David Erb, as a cigar factory and retail store. Across the street, 2 East Philadelphia Avenue was built in 1875, by D.B. Boyer as a department store that employed six full time clerks. On the other side of the street, 1 South Reading Avenue is the Boyertown Inn which replaced the original log tavern built by the Boyers who founded the town. And 1 West Philadelphia Avenue hosts the BB&T Bank Building, where you will also find Bear Fever Bears— Hal Bear-toia and Mary Beary.

Mural: 30 South Reading

Look over a bit south on Reading Avenue to see a replica of a painting done by Boyertown artist David Larson which captures the unique qualities of the Boyertown area, semi-rural environment, family owned homes, rolling hills, historic architecture, industry and agriculture. This incredible large scale piece illustrates Boyertown as A Special Kind of Place.

Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles
85 West Walnut Street

Proceeding now, west on West Philadelphia Avenue, you‘re going to be turning left on Walnut Street to the Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles. Are you too young to remember the original roadside diners and Sunoco gas stations that dotted the American roadside? Or trucks that delivered milk and other farm products? You can see this historic transportation that made such a difference in life in America, along with buggies, carriages, wagons, trolleys, and truck bodies that were manufactured right in Boyertown, first at the 1872 Jeremiah Sweinhart Carriage Factory, and later at the Boyertown Body Works, which grew from the horse drawn era to the automotive age, on a site that evolved to meet new needs while it operated until 1990. Both of these buildings are now both part of the Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles, which offers either guided or self-guided tours.

During World War II, the Boyertown Body Works produced Navy and Marine Corps four-wheel-drive frontline ambulances and trailer-based mobile machine shops, prosthetic laboratories, tire repair shops, shoe and canvas repair units, hospital operating rooms and boxing and packaging units. They were awarded the prestigious Army-Navy ―E flag and four additional stars for outstanding war time production.

Dancing Tree Creations Artisan’s Gallery and Studio
220 South Reading Avenue

Back now on South Reading Avenue on your way to Dancing Tree Creations Artisan’s Gallery an Studio, you will pass Bear Fever Bear ―Monty at Gerhart Hartman and Ritner Insurance, and Rich at Rich at Erb Construction and Lady A. Once you reach Dancing Tree, if you’re looking for a special piece for your home, a gift for a special friend that must be out of the ordinary, or something special for yourself, a visit to Dancing Tree Creations allows you to explore work created by 200 national, regional and local artists in ceramics, glass, jewelry, metal, wood, fiber, garden art, stone, prints and cards, and useful handmade items, including the work of nearly 45 jewelry makers all the way from California to Canada and more than 20 fiber and textile artists. You will also discover Lyn‘s Dancing Trees which gave the shop its name.

Owners Lyn and Beth retired from their corporate jobs to pursue their passion, creating a shop that is an absolute visual bonanza. They want all their visitors to know about the artists who created the work they purchase and how the items were made, so that there will be a special connection between the artist and the buyer each time the piece is viewed, worn or used.

Simply Sherry’s Bakery
14 South Reading Avenue

On you way back to Historic Boyertown‘s central intersection, you’ll see a three story structure built in 1874 which was the traditional meeting place of Democratic political conventions. At 14 South Reading, you can watch and taste the work of Sherry and her team. Boyertown’s own butter cream frosting artist who that delivers desserts that steal the show that will have you craving cupcake brownies, Irish Coffee cupcakes, pumpkin crumble muffins, spiced apple gingerbread, chocolate chip cookie dough cheesecake, traditional Pennsylvania pretzels in several flavors, triple chocolate and peach macaroons, death by chocolate, salty caramel chocolate chip, and peach crumb pie cupcakes, and peach sticky bun bread pudding with bourbon caramel sauce!

Even when working previously in finance, Sherry spent time with pastry chefs learning her incredible craft before coming home to Boyertown to delight patrons with cupcakes, cakes and other scrumptious treats. Yum!

Weidner‘s Deli
12 North Reading Avenue

Right next door, Weidner’s Deli was a favorite at Zern’s Farmers Market until they relocated to downtown Boyertown. Their store, featuring Pennsylvania’s own Genuine Jerky, is packed full of regional cuisine, including sweet bag bologna, beef sticks, garlic jerky, ring bologna, longhorn cheese, pickles, hippey hot dogs, Clearfield American cheese, Buffalo Wing cheese, Stoltzfus smoked ham, country scrapple, double smoked bacon, sauerkraut, Kielbasa sticks, Dietz Nuts meat sticks, BBQ, muenster cheese, Cooper sharp cheese, Pepperoni sticks – you get the picture. All of these treats can be vacuum packed and shipped to friends and family around the world. Or, pick some up to snack on while you’re in town. We guarantee the shop will make your taste buds hanker for all the great traditional Pennsylvania Dutch foods.

The Peppermint Stick Candy Store
26 East Philadelphia Avenue

Back at Boyertown’s central intersection, turn now East to walk down Philadelphia Avenue. First, you’ll meet Bear Fever Doc before discovering The Peppermint Stick Candy Store. Oldsters in the crowd will remember a time when you could go to the neighborhood candy store with a few pennies and walk out with a bagful of treats. At The Peppermint Stick Candy store, which features candy from simpler times, you can still do that. Try some root beer barrels, caramels and horehounds, or 15 varieties of mix and match candy. Move to today with scrumptious, milk, dark, and white chocolate favorites, some mixed with peanut butter and others smothered in caramel. The Peppermint Stick Candy Store will ship any and all to your loved ones.

MJ’s Legacy
112 East Philadelphia Avenue

Further on East Philadelphia Avenue, in a building that was once a restaurant operated by The Greeks, John Demetre and Nicholas George, as they were called locally, you can visit MJ’s Legacy. Featuring more than 25 vendors specializing in handmade crafts, antiques, vintage items, collectibles, and home décor. Take time to browse through dozens of individual displays looking for that special piece or unique item that has been repurposed for your home. If you can’t find what you’re looking for, Margie will be happy to help you make the right selection, or make suggestions on how to make it extra special.

Colebrookdale Railroad: The Secret Valley Line
East Philadelphia Avenue
Parking at 62 South Washington Avenue

Still on East Philadelphia Avenue, you’ll pass the railroad tracks and entrance to the Colebrookdale Railroad, the 8.6 mile Secret Valley Line which takes you into the heart of the Secret Valley, now home to deer, great blue herons, bald eagles and majestic trees whispering softly in the wind. The valley looks much like it did when iron-willed pioneers who first ventured along the cold, rushing creek more than 300 years ago established the first ironworks in the New World and ultimately produced ammunition for George Washington’s Continental Army. You’ll learn the full story of the pioneering ironmasters, and halfway through the journey, overlook the residence where George Washington stayed while pushing the region‘s ironmasters to step up work to keep the Continental Army fully equipped. The train and its cars have been completely restored by the loving hands of hundreds of volunteers who take great pride in the now polished wood, soft upholstery and elegant traditional detailing.

The Other Farm and Forge
128 East Philadelphia Avenue

A bit further to the east, The Other Farm and Forge is carrying on the brewing traditions in the Degler Building that once housed the Boyertown Brewery. Over the past decade, they have grown from a sleepy little café to an entertainment venue and community centerpiece, connecting people from all walks of life with music, drink, and food. In addition to brewing their own classic beers with hops grown locally, The Other Farm has sourced their favorite ciders, wines and meads produced by artisans throughout Southeastern Pennsylvania.

Their unique dining menu served as both small plates and full meals features truffle parmesan fries, red and golden beet salad, roasted wild mushrooms, cured ham and fig, mussels and fries, roasted mushroom poutine, lamb burger and other new offerings that peacefully coexist with traditional southeastern Pennsylvania favorites such as macaroni and cheese, homemade pierogies, burgers, sandwiches, and wood fired pizza.

Brakeman’s Cafe
56 South Washington Street

Turning right on Washington Street, walk down a block to the popular coffee spot Brakeman’s Cafe. Built in a carriage house, Brakeman’s serves Twin Valley nitro brew coffee, as well as a full menu of hot and cold drinks. Offering a seasonal breakfast and lunch menu, you can always expect a warm welcome and delicious treat.  

Taylor Backes
150 South Washington Street

Continuing along Washington Street, walk down a block to the Eisenhard’s machine shop graced by Disco Bear, where, for more than 30 years, the uniquely talented artists at Taylor Backes have been creating works of art in glass using both immense creativity and meticulous attention to detail. Says one customer, ― Boyertown‘s best kept secret! Says another, ― the difference here is everything is beautiful and as perfect as something handmade can be. Still a third relates ―I enjoy watching the glass blowing and creating the beautiful works in glass.

You can learn to blow glass or just watch breathlessly while exquisite pieces of glass art emerge. While the artists are working the molten glass and you are admiring the results, you will also be learning about the world of glass, and the many ways to tap its creative potential. Glass extraordinaire indeed! Don’t miss it while you’re in town.

Boyertown Area Historical Society
43 South Chestnut Street

On South Chestnut, the next street west from Washington, the Boyertown Area Historical Society is located on a home originally constructed of Pennsylvania blue marble by George Unger, who started the electric company in Boyertown and other civic services. The building was purchased by St. Columbkill Roman Catholic Church as a chapel and rectory in 1921 and later purchased by the Historical Society to feature the important history of Boyertown. The featured artifacts go all the way back to the stove plates produced by the Colebrookdale Furnace, the first iron furnace established here in 1718. There is also an extensive exhibit on the devastating Opera House fire, which had a dramatic impact on Boyertown families when it occurred, and is still an influence today. You’ll also meet Bear Fever Nostalgia Bear Julie‘s Jingles

Studio B
39 East Philadelphia Avenue

Leaving the Historical Society, you’ll meet Tai Kwon Do Bear, The Count and, Bearsnickle before reaching Studio B, located in a historic building constructed by the Independent Order of Odd Fellows (founded in England in the 18th century as a social organization to provide aid for working men) in 1925, that included a community room for dinners, parties and other activities. The main meeting room has seen few major changes since completion. Working to inspire budding artists in the community, Studio B is the organization that brought you Bear Fever and regularly delivers new art exhibits.

The Gallery’s On the Road exhibit showcased work of regional artists who were provided with consistently-sized canvases to illustrate creativity in their current art medium. Other creative and inspiring shows have included: Cul-ti-vate: art inspired by agriculture; Til Death Do Us Art: a couple who both produce creative works; Out of the Woods: works by another couple with the last name Wood, Shine: holiday ornaments, Vessel: two and three dimensional containers, and It’s Raining Cats and Dogs: art inspired by cats and dogs.

State Theater
61 North Reading Avenue

As you make your way west to the main intersection, turn right and the State Theater is at the end of the block. On your way, you‘ll meet Bear Fever Artie at 35 East Philadelphia Avenue, Box at 17 East Philadelphia Avenue, Gra-Bear at 7 East Philadelphia Avenue, and Teddy Bearsecker, Bear-gon, Mary Beary, Hal Bear-toia, Bear Odessy, Paul Bear and the new State Theater Movie Bear.

The now completely restored Art Deco theater that shows first run movies using the latest technology and featuring modern comforts, was built to show silent movies when tickets cost ten cents for adults and five cents for children. Enjoy the mural on the side of the State Theater, another depiction of Historic Boyertown. From there, the Twin Turrets awaits!

Fairview Cemetery
West Philadelphia Avenue

When you’ve had a few moments to refresh, we encourage you to walk west, back up Philadelphia Avenue to the Fairview Cemetery for the absolutely best views of Historic Boyertown. Along the way, you‘ll meet White Bear at 35 West Philadelphia Avenue, Lincoln Bear at 251 West Philadelphia Avenue and GI Joe at 317 West Philadelphia Avenue. Now a place of peace, Fairview Cemetery, like everyone and everywhere else in Boyertown, was dramatically impacted by the Rhodes Opera House fire, in which, despite heroic efforts of firefighters, 165 people perished in 15 minutes. When the stage curtains caught fire and the whole building erupted in flames during a benefit production for St. John’s Lutheran Sunday School, the tragedy forever changed Boyertown. The placement of a monument to the 25 victims who could not be identified was witnessed by the 7,000 people came to Boyertown to mourn.

Walk up to the highest point in Fairview Cemetery for absolutely spectacular views of our delightful historic town! Or better yet, pick up the fixings for a picnic at Brakeman‘s Café and enjoy it in Fairview, like the Victorians did, high over town.

Welcome to Historic Boyertown! Our quaint, historic town is the oldest in the region— with property records for the land dating back to 1601—more than 75 years before William Penn arrived in America! Also, few know that Boyertown is the gateway to one of the most historic regions in the United States, where, in 1718, the iron industry in the New World was born, and an area that George Washington frequented when he needed arms for the American Revolution. Before moving on to learn these fascinating stories on Historic Boyertown’s seven regional trails, which incorporate our special attractions in Boyertown, as well as the wealth of interesting locations within a 20 mile radius surrounding our town, you can enjoy the first class historic attractions, shops, and restaurants that catch your eye, and learn about our heritage right in town.

Over 250 years ago, when iron ore was discovered right under the streets of Boyertown, the town began a tradition of making things. Soon Boyertown was bustling with manufacturing everything from cigars produced from local tobacco, carriages and other vehicles used on local farms, caskets that ultimately became world renown, and some of the first car and truck bodies manufactured in America.

As the centuries passed, Boyertown evolved into the impeccably preserved, walkable, charming place you see today. The Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles features the antique carriages and vehicles made right here in town. Taylor Backes, Dancing Tree Creations and Studio B produce and display fine art, glass and works of regional and national artists. The Colebrookdale Railroad takes you back to the 1920s. And, you can taste and savor local food produced by loving hands and timeless traditions.

To make your walk through Historic Boyertown most interesting, we’ve combined information about the historic buildings you‟ll pass by, in which historic attractions , shops and restaurants are now located, plus details about the “Bears” you’ll see that are part of the Bear Fever Trail that runs through town. More than 70 bears were sponsored by local merchants, civic organizations and businesses around town, all originally painted by local high school students. Once they caught on, there are now bears in Boyertown that were decorated by artists across the country.

Twin Turrets Inn
11 East Philadelphia Avenue

When you plan your visit to Historic Boyertown, we are confident that you will want to spend plenty of time exploring our town and our trails. Accommodations at the Twin Turrets Inn, 11 East Philadelphia Avenue let you stay in high Victorian style, plus place you right at the center of town with exploring to do in all directions.

You’ll meet your first two Bear Fever bears, Boyertown High School’s Townie Bear and Bubbles that grace each side of the Twin Turrets. The former residence of the Boyer family has been completely restored into an elegant Bed and Breakfast with 10 rooms. Marianne Deery, owner of Twin Turrets also serves as the very delightful Mayor of Boyertown. Enjoy her gracious hospitality and the high style accommodations when you stay.

Historic Boyertown Visitors Center
Building A Better Boyertown Office
3 East Philadelphia Avenue

Leaving the Twin Turrets, just up the street you‘ll find the Historic Boyertown Visitors Center located inside the Building A Better Boyertown Office, located in a building that originally served as a residence and store rooms for D. B. Boyer‘s cigar factory next door at 1 East Philadelphia. In 1866, the location became the head office of one of the local iron works, an industry that drove the economy in town for more than a century.

The Visitors Center has information about all the local attractions, regional trails and services and amenities available in Boyertown, and can also help you with the Bear Fever Walk. There‘s a lot to see and do here, and we want to make your visit the most enjoyable possible.

Intersection of Philadelphia and Reading Avenues

Walking west towards Reading Avenue will take you to the most important crossroads in the area. Long before Boyertown, this was the intersection of Native Americans trails between Reading and Philadelphia, Allentown and Pottstown. Look up at the crisply painted trim at the top of the buildings; detailing which characterizes buildings constructed when Boyertown began growing during the reign of Queen Victoria between 1840 and 1910. Builders began incorporating the non-traditional shapes, colors, towers, turrets, dormers, wide wrap around porches, stained glass windows and colorfully painted ornate trim work that became the hallmark of this era.

Looking around at the four corners, you‘ll see 1 East Philadelphia Avenue, built by D.B. Boyer for his daughter‘s husband David Erb, as a cigar factory and retail store. Across the street, 2 East Philadelphia Avenue was built in 1875, by D.B. Boyer as a department store that employed six full time clerks. On the other side of the street, 1 South Reading Avenue is the Boyertown Inn which replaced the original log tavern built by the Boyers who founded the town. And 1 West Philadelphia Avenue hosts the BB&T Bank Building, where you will also find Bear Fever Bears— Hal Bear-toia and Mary Beary.

Mural: 30 South Reading

Look over a bit south on Reading Avenue to see a replica of a painting done by Boyertown artist David Larson which captures the unique qualities of the Boyertown area, semi-rural environment, family owned homes, rolling hills, historic architecture, industry and agriculture. This incredible large scale piece illustrates Boyertown as A Special Kind of Place.

Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles
85 West Walnut Street

Proceeding now, west on West Philadelphia Avenue, you‘re going to be turning left on Walnut Street to the Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles. Are you too young to remember the original roadside diners and Sunoco gas stations that dotted the American roadside? Or trucks that delivered milk and other farm products? You can see this historic transportation that made such a difference in life in America, along with buggies, carriages, wagons, trolleys, and truck bodies that were manufactured right in Boyertown, first at the 1872 Jeremiah Sweinhart Carriage Factory, and later at the Boyertown Body Works, which grew from the horse drawn era to the automotive age, on a site that evolved to meet new needs while it operated until 1990. Both of these buildings are now both part of the Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles, which offers either guided or self-guided tours.

During World War II, the Boyertown Body Works produced Navy and Marine Corps four-wheel-drive frontline ambulances and trailer-based mobile machine shops, prosthetic laboratories, tire repair shops, shoe and canvas repair units, hospital operating rooms and boxing and packaging units. They were awarded the prestigious Army-Navy ―E flag and four additional stars for outstanding war time production.

Dancing Tree Creations
220 South Reading Avenue

Back now on South Reading Avenue on your way to Dancing Tree Creations, you will pass Bear Fever Bear ―Monty‖ at Gerhart Hartman and Ritner Insurance, and Rich‖ at Rich at Erb Construction and Lady A. Once you reach Dancing Tree, if you‘re looking for a special piece for your home, a gift for a special friend that must be out of the ordinary, or something special for yourself, a visit to Dancing Tree Creations allows you to explore work created by 200 national, regional and local artists in ceramics, glass, jewelry, metal, wood, fiber, garden art, stone, prints and cards, and useful handmade items, including the work of nearly 45 jewelry makers all the way from California to Canada and more than 20 fiber and textile artists. You will also discover Lyn‘s ―Dancing Trees which gave the shop its name.

Owners Lyn and Beth retired from their corporate jobs to pursue their passion, creating a shop that is an absolute visual bonanza. They want all their visitors to know about the artists who created the work they purchase and how the items were made, so that there will be a special connection between the artist and the buyer each time the piece is viewed, worn or used.

Simply Sherry’s Bakery
14 South Reading Avenue

On you way back to Historic Boyertown‘s central intersection, you’ll see a three story structure built in 1874 which was the traditional meeting place of Democratic political conventions. At 14 South Reading, you can watch and taste the work of Sherry and her team. Boyertown’s own butter cream frosting artist who that delivers desserts that steal the show that will have you craving cupcake brownies, Irish Coffee cupcakes, pumpkin crumble muffins, spiced apple gingerbread, chocolate chip cookie dough cheesecake, traditional Pennsylvania pretzels in several flavors, triple chocolate and peach macaroons, death by chocolate, salty caramel chocolate chip, and peach crumb pie cupcakes, and peach sticky bun bread pudding with bourbon caramel sauce!

Even when working previously in finance, Sherry spent time with pastry chefs learning her incredible craft before coming home to Boyertown to delight patrons with cupcakes, cakes and other scrumptious treats. Yum!

Weidner’s Deli
12 North Reading Avenue

Right next door, Weidner’s Deli was a favorite at Zern’s Farmers Market until they relocated to downtown Boyertown. Their store, featuring Pennsylvania’s own Genuine Jerky, is packed full of regional cuisine, including sweet bag bologna, beef sticks, garlic jerky, ring bologna, longhorn cheese, pickles, hippey hot dogs, Clearfield American cheese, Buffalo Wing cheese, Stoltzfus smoked ham, country scrapple, double smoked bacon, sauerkraut, Kielbasa sticks, Dietz Nuts meat sticks, BBQ, muenster cheese, Cooper sharp cheese, Pepperoni sticks – you get the picture. All of these treats can be vacuum packed and shipped to friends and family around the world. Or, pick some up to snack on while you’re in town. We guarantee the shop will make your taste buds hanker for all the great traditional Pennsylvania Dutch foods.

Peppermint Stick Candy Store
26 East Philadelphia Avenue

Back at Boyertown’s central intersection, turn now East to walk down Philadelphia Avenue. First, you’ll meet Bear Fever Doc before discovering the Peppermint Stick Candy Store. Oldsters in the crowd will remember a time when you could go to the neighborhood candy store with a few pennies and walk out with a bagful of treats. At the Peppermint Stick Candy store, which features candy from simpler times, you can still do that. Try some root beer barrels, caramels and horehounds, or 15 varieties of mix and match candy. Move to today with scrumptious, milk, dark, and white chocolate favorites, some mixed with peanut butter and others smothered in caramel. The Peppermint Stick Candy Store will ship any and all to your loved ones.

MJ’s Legacy
112 East Philadelphia Avenue

Further on East Philadelphia Avenue, in a building that was once a restaurant operated by The Greeks, John Demetre and Nicholas George, as they were called locally, you can visit MJ’s Legacy. Featuring more than 25 vendors specializing in handmade crafts, antiques, vintage items, collectibles, and home décor. Take time to browse through dozens of individual displays looking for that special piece or unique item that has been repurposed for your home. If you can’t find what you’re looking for, Margie will be happy to help you make the right selection, or make suggestions on how to make it extra special.

Colebrookdale Railroad: The Secret Valley Line
East Philadelphia Avenue
Parking at 62 South Washington Avenue

Still on East Philadelphia Avenue, you’ll pass the railroad tracks and entrance to the Colebrookdale Railroad, the 8.6 mile Secret Valley Line which takes you into the heart of the Secret Valley, now home to deer, great blue herons, bald eagles and majestic trees whispering softly in the wind. The valley looks much like it did when iron-willed pioneers who first ventured along the cold, rushing creek more than 300 years ago established the first ironworks in the New World and ultimately produced ammunition for George Washington’s Continental Army. You’ll learn the full story of the pioneering ironmasters, and halfway through the journey, overlook the residence where George Washington stayed while pushing the region‘s ironmasters to step up work to keep the Continental Army fully equipped. The train and its cars have been completely restored by the loving hands of hundreds of volunteers who take great pride in the now polished wood, soft upholstery and elegant traditional detailing.

The Other Farm and Forge
128 East Philadelphia Avenue

A bit further to the east, The Other Farm and Forge is carrying on the brewing traditions in the Degler Building that once housed the Boyertown Brewery. Over the past decade, they have grown from a sleepy little café to an entertainment venue and community centerpiece, connecting people from all walks of life with music, drink, and food. In addition to brewing their own classic beers with hops grown locally, The Other Farm has sourced their favorite ciders, wines and meads produced by artisans throughout Southeastern Pennsylvania.

Their unique dining menu served as both small plates and full meals features truffle parmesan fries, red and golden beet salad, roasted wild mushrooms, cured ham and fig, mussels and fries, roasted mushroom poutine, lamb burger and other new offerings that peacefully coexist with traditional southeastern Pennsylvania favorites such as macaroni and cheese, homemade pierogies, burgers, sandwiches, and wood fired pizza.

Brakeman’s Cafe
56 South Washington Street

Turning right on Washington Street, walk down a block to the popular coffee spot Brakeman’s Cafe. Built in a carriage house, Brakeman’s serves Twin Valley nitro brew coffee, as well as a full menu of hot and cold drinks. Offering a seasonal breakfast and lunch menu, you can always expect a warm welcome and delicious treat.  

Taylor Backes
150 South Washington Street

Continuing on Washington Street, walk down a block to the Eisenhard’s machine shop graced by Disco Bear, where, for more than 30 years, the uniquely talented artists at Taylor Backes have been creating works of art in glass using both immense creativity and meticulous attention to detail. Says one customer, ― Boyertown‘s best kept secret! Says another, ― the difference here is everything is beautiful and as perfect as something handmade can be. Still a third relates ―I enjoy watching the glass blowing and creating the beautiful works in glass.

You can learn to blow glass or just watch breathlessly while exquisite pieces of glass art emerge. While the artists are working the molten glass and you are admiring the results, you will also be learning about the world of glass, and the many ways to tap its creative potential. Glass extraordinaire indeed! Don’t miss it while you’re in town.

Boyertown Area Historical Society
43 South Chestnut Street

On South Chestnut, the next street west from Washington, the Boyertown Area Historical Society is located on a home originally constructed of Pennsylvania blue marble by George Unger, who started the electric company in Boyertown and other civic services. The building was purchased by St. Columbkill Roman Catholic Church as a chapel and rectory in 1921 and later purchased by the Historical Society to feature the important history of Boyertown. The featured artifacts go all the way back to the stove plates produced by the Colebrookdale Furnace, the first iron furnace established here in 1718. There is also an extensive exhibit on the devastating Opera House fire, which had a dramatic impact on Boyertown families when it occurred, and is still an influence today. You’ll also meet Bear Fever Nostalgia Bear Julie‘s Jingles

Studio B
39 East Philadelphia Avenue

Leaving the Historical Society, you’ll meet Tai Kwon Do Bear, The Count and, Bearsnickle before reaching Studio B, located in a historic building constructed by the Independent Order of Odd Fellows (founded in England in the 18th century as a social organization to provide aid for working men) in 1925, that included a community room for dinners, parties and other activities. The main meeting room has seen few major changes since completion. Working to inspire budding artists in the community, Studio B is the organization that brought you Bear Fever and regularly delivers new art exhibits.

The Gallery’s On the Road exhibit showcased work of regional artists who were provided with consistently-sized canvases to illustrate creativity in their current art medium. Other creative and inspiring shows have included: Cul-ti-vate: art inspired by agriculture; Til Death Do Us Art: a couple who both produce creative works; Out of the Woods: works by another couple with the last name Wood, Shine: holiday ornaments, Vessel: two and three dimensional containers, and It’s Raining Cats and Dogs: art inspired by cats and dogs.

State Theater
61 North Reading Avenue

As you make your way west to the main intersection, turn right and the State Theater is at the end of the block. On your way, you‘ll meet Bear Fever Artie at 35 East Philadelphia Avenue, Box at 17 East Philadelphia Avenue, Gra-Bear at 7 East Philadelphia Avenue, and Teddy Bearsecker, Bear-gon, Mary Beary, Hal Bear-toia, Bear Odessy, Paul Bear and the new State Theater Movie Bear.

The now completely restored Art Deco theater that shows first run movies using the latest technology and featuring modern comforts, was built to show silent movies when tickets cost ten cents for adults and five cents for children. Enjoy the mural on the side of the State Theater, another depiction of Historic Boyertown. From there, the Twin Turrets awaits!

Fairview Cemetery
West Philadelphia Avenue

When you’ve had a few moments to refresh, we encourage you to walk west, back up Philadelphia Avenue to the Fairview Cemetery for the absolutely best views of Historic Boyertown. Along the way, you‘ll meet White Bear at 35 West Philadelphia Avenue, Lincoln Bear at 251 West Philadelphia Avenue and GI Joe at 317 West Philadelphia Avenue. Now a place of peace, Fairview Cemetery, like everyone and everywhere else in Boyertown, was dramatically impacted by the Rhodes Opera House fire, in which, despite heroic efforts of firefighters, 165 people perished in 15 minutes. When the stage curtains caught fire and the whole building erupted in flames during a benefit production for St. John’s Lutheran Sunday School, the tragedy forever changed Boyertown. The placement of a monument to the 25 victims who could not be identified was witnessed by the 7,000 people came to Boyertown to mourn.

Walk up to the highest point in Fairview Cemetery for absolutely spectacular views of our delightful historic town! Or better yet, pick up the fixings for a picnic at Brakeman‘s Café and enjoy it in Fairview, like the Victorians did, high over town.